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Are They Dead Yet?

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By Stephen Mackey

A few weeks ago I received a newsletter from the Friends of Janet Clarke. Within the newsletter was Janet’s list of priorities for the next Board of Supervisors. Among others, the list contained the following items:

  • Respect property rights.
  • Help protect our agricultural community and preserve historic properties.
  • Create more transparency, openness, and accountability in government to promote better communication between individuals and their elected officials.

Having recently formed an alliance with Sam and Uta Brown in their fight to save their 250 year-old farm, Crooked Run Orchard, from the malicious quick-take actions perpetrated by the Purcellville Town Council, I felt it appropriate to approach Janet and request her support for the Browns. It seemed logical to me that a candidate espousing property rights would abhor such a quick-take action, particularly from an elderly couple who has made it abundantly clear that they desire to continue farming. Further, the Browns have also made it known that their wish in their passing is to create a foundation in order to leave Crooked Run Orchard to the people of Loudoun County, so that future generations can enjoy and learn from the land.

Having received no response to my inquiry for several days, I returned home from a morning of running errands to find Janet Clarke and Town Councilman James “Doc” Wiley standing unannounced in our winery tasting room. Janet indicated she felt it important that I hear “both sides of the Crooked Run story” since Doc has such a long history in the town and would be able to clarify the motives of the Town Council for me. She also advised me she was “worried about my reputation” since I had sided so strongly with the Browns and she wanted to ensure I had the complete perspective.

I questioned and listened to Doc for over an hour, he became increasingly frustrated at my queries, apparently not expecting my research to be so thorough nor my position to be so firm. When I asked him how he would feel if the Town had seized his property he agreed, “I would be pretty upset about it too.” When I told him I do not believe the Southern Collector Road (SCR) will solve the traffic problems on the east side of Purcellville (once the subsequent development is completed) he agreed saying, “you’re probably right.” I then asked him if he truly did not believe the SCR was going to actually solve anything, but rather just trade one set of traffic issues for larger ones later, he indicated he was elected by the people of Purcellville to do a job and that “a decision had to be made.” When I pressed the issue, he finally crossed his arms, sat back in his chair and said in a huff, “Well, they’re old people anyway, and that land is going to be used for something else.”

I sat there in stunned disbelief; incredulous that Janet (quietly listening to this exchange) somehow felt that having Doc spell out this predatory mindset for me would somehow alter my opinion of the Browns or their predicament. After having her 99-year old grandfather lead the pledge of allegiance at the Republican convention, then personally driving Doc to my home to explain the Town Council’s motives, she was somehow worried about my reputation?

After this exchange I asked Doc if he felt the building of the SCR through the land seized by Mayor Lazaro and the Town Council was a foregone conclusion, or would the Town go back to the table and re-negotiate with the Browns? He indicated he would certainly reconsider on three conditions. One, the Browns would have to agree to sell the smaller two-acre parcel, effectively dividing their property. Two, the Browns would have to drop their lawsuit against the Town. Three, someone would have to reimburse the Town the several hundred thousand dollars they have spent on planning the road through the land they seized.

I told Doc I thought that his last condition was utterly inappropriate, that the Town Council was singularly at fault for spending that money after jumping the gun on the quick-take. I felt his first two points may be reasonable, but that the Browns should be given a plan for the crossing of the road in order to continue their farming operations. Doc insisted the Town had communicated this to the Browns, but again as I pressed the issue he finally admitted that in fact no definitive plan was ever delivered to the Browns, merely an “assurance that the Town would work with them” to create a solution. He indicated that the Town would not spend the money to create such a solution until the Browns agreed to sell their two acres; they just needed to take it on faith that an acceptable solution would be forthcoming after the sale. Who in their right mind would accept such terms?

I thanked Doc for his time, and was sincerely appreciative for him making the effort to communicate his positions (however misguided) – the only member of the Town leadership who has had the courage or courtesy to do so. As he and Janet drove away, I suddenly became deeply saddened for the future of the Town of Purcellville, as well as western Loudoun. We are all at a fork in the road, with Crooked Run Orchard right in the middle and our collective souls hanging in the balance. Down one path lie big box stores, chain restaurants, parking lots, traffic congestion, and wealthy developers. Down the other lies a historical bedroom community, the hub of rural Loudoun, with agri-tourism attractions, local eclectic small businesses, and family values, not the least of which is respect for the elderly and appreciation for the lessons of our forefathers.

Unfortunately for the Town Council, the Browns are still very much alive and well. They are intelligent, passionate, committed, and gaining momentum in their efforts to save their farm. A forthcoming petition and survey will show the economic impact their business has upon the other businesses within the Town. However, they cannot win this fight alone, and the voters of the Town of Purcellville and the Blue Ridge District need to ask themselves, “What is the real price of progress? What is my conscience worth?” To answer those questions, we as a community need to define the difference between prosperity and plunder, make our values known on election day, and ensure a sustainable, wholesome and untarnished future for our children.

Stephen Mackey is Co-Founder & Wine Composer,
Notaviva Vineyards, LLC.

View From the Ridge – by Conan the Warrior Pig

August 4, 2011 Columns, View From the Ridge Comments Off on View From the Ridge – by Conan the Warrior Pig
Conan

Conan the Pig’s life changed completely last month as the Town of Purcellville entered his home, Crooked Run Orchard, and began clearing land and trees in preparation for the Southern Collector Road. This is Conan’s story …

Hi. My name is Conan. Conan the Warrior Pig. Silly name for a pig, don’t you think? I’m nineteen, or twenty years old, (I forget) and I’ve lived all but the first three months of my life on Crooked Run Orchard Farm. Not a bad life. Lots of fruit. Lots of straw.

Until last Monday when the farmer for no good reason put a halter on me and opened my pen and started hauling me out of the barn. It was awful. I pulled as hard as I could but I couldn’t keep him from hauling me out of the barn. I screamed, I dug in my feet, I tried to stop him. We did stop, many times. In fact, we stopped under a tree for a while and I rested. I was very out of breath. This was enormously stressful for me. My breathing was coming on me hard and I was getting rubbed down to the skin with the halter. But for some reason the farmer started pulling me again. When we started it was day. When I finally got to my new pen it was night. … Continue Reading

We Remember Janet Clarke

By Nick Pelchar

Janet Clarke voted repeatedly with the Purcellville Town Council to sue Loudoun County to block the construction of Woodgrove High School. The school is now built exactly where the County want- ed it built. What changed things? After the Lazaro Council held the students of Western Loudoun hostage for 3 years Janet Clark spearheaded the effort to extort nearly $6 million dollars from Loudoun County to put in the town’s cof- fers. An effort she is very proud of today. In truth, Janet Clark and the Purcellville Town Council held the children of Western Loudoun hostage. They were ransomed for nearly $6 million dollars. There is no other way to say it. Ms. Clarke admits that her own children were victims of the Purcellville Town Council’s greed which resulted in unnecessarily overcrowded schools for years. What should we infer about a woman who would sacrifice the well-being of her own children to further her political capital?

If there was ever a more twisted com- munity battle in America than the Woodgrove High lawsuits I would like to hear it. Blue Ridge Board of Supervisors candidate Janet Clarke’s reaction to criti- cism that she was part of an extremely liti- gious Purcellville Town Council by claiming credit for affecting a resolution is disingenu- ous. Her notes and study of Purcellville’s recent history are inaccurate and revision- ary. The Loudoun County Board of Supervisors purchased the Fields Farm property in 2000 and immediately provided a plan to build an elementary and a high school on the property as agreed to and provided for in the PUGAMP (Purcellville Urban Growth and Management Plan). The anti-school arguments that followed and were supported by Purcellville Town Council Member Janet Clarke were based on fear and ignorance. Now that Woodgrove High School is built none of the “problems” the Lazaro/Clarke Council cited have proven true. Purcellville’s Town Council would not have appointed Ms. Clarke to serve on council if she disagreed with their filing lawsuit after lawsuit against the County in order to fight Woodgrove High School.

Dear Ms. Clarke – THEIR public schools are OUR public schools.

What did the Lazaro Council do with the $6 million they extorted from the Loudoun County taxpayers? They went to court again and have condemned land on Crooked Run Orchard, a farm which has been in the Brown family for 250 years. The Southern “Commercial” Road (Southern Collector Road) is well under- way. The Lazaro/Clarke Council has been successful in trading an apple grove for a strip mall. Stop by Crooked Run and take a look at what the Town of Purcellville is doing to Sam and Uta Brown’s farm. They are destroying a state landmark and a fami- ly’s livelihood. All in a day’s work on the dais at the Purcellville Town Council. For this abhorrent decision I blame you Ms. Clarke. Afterall,youweretheoneto spearhead the effort to extort the money which made this destruction possible.

Janet Clarke, who is eager to point out that she now has a child attending the dreaded Woodgrove High School she fought so hard against would like to be your Blue Ridge Supervisor. I wonder what she thinks about Woodgrove now?

She would like you to vote for her to represent you on the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors. Before you press the lever remember that Janet Clarke sacrificed the children of Western Loudoun to further her own political career. Remember who is paying the bill for the $6 million dollars she is so proud to have extorted from the County. YouandIarepayingthebill. Every resident of Loudoun County is pay- ing the bill.

Editor’s Note: Janet Clarke was appointed to the Purcellville Town Council in July 2006 to fill the seat left vacant by Bob Lazaro when he was elected Mayor. Nicholas Pelchar served on the Council from July 2002 to June 2006. There was no litigation between the Town of Purcellville and Loudoun County while Mr. Pelchar served on the Council. Contrary to Mrs. Clarke’s statement, litigation against the County regarding Woodgrove High School began and was voted on during her tenure on the Purcellville Town Council.

“And Change Just Happens”

March 10, 2011 Columns, View From the Ridge Comments Off on “And Change Just Happens”
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By Kelli Grim

At the last Ways and Means Committee meeting, Town Council member Dr. Wiley said some remarkable things. When referring to change, he said, “Nobody likes it, but we have to manage it as best we can when it occurs. We have no control over it. We have very little control of what kinds of businesses … we’d all like to see more different kinds of businesses … I would like for it to be the same as when I moved here in 1958. Nobody wants the [town to] change. It has. It will. It’s what the Planning Commission in particular has to be aware of.”

Dr. Wiley’s fatalism goes a long way towards explaining why our town is turning into a series of strip malls. … Continue Reading

A Spending Perspective

November 2, 2010 Columns, View From the Ridge Comments Off on A Spending Perspective

In this day of enormous budget headlines, we tend to lose a small town perspective on what we are spending.

We see headlines about trillion dollar Federal deficits, and therefore when we read about Town expenditures – a million dollars for this project or ten million for that project – we don’t even bat an eye.

But when you consider that Purcellville’s spending burdens just 2,400 homes, the numbers begin to feel a little different.

  • The total town debt is the equivalent of seven years general fund revenue. If the five year plan is implemented, it will go up to about 11 years of general fund revenue.
  • The cost of the old Baptist Church (for the new Town Hall) without any improvements was approximately the total real estate tax collections for Purcellville for one year or approximately the amount Purcellville collects in personal property taxes (car tax) in six years. When the total cost of the expected repairs and the parking lot (across the street at Fireman’s Field) is considered, it equates to entire real estate tax revenue for 5-½ years or the car tax revenue for 30 years.
  • The cost of the proposed Main and Maple intersection improvements equals the entire real estate revenue for five years.
  • The new maintenance facility equals 2-½ years of the entire real estate revenue or 15 years of the car tax.
  • The repairs to the skating rink equal approximately the entire real estate revenue for one year.
  • The proposed purchase of new town vehicles for this year alone equals approximately the entire car tax for the next three years.
  • The General Fund debt service is equal to approximately two thirds of the total real estate tax revenue. The five year capital expenditure plan for the General Fund is equivalent to six years of the total real estate tax revenue. This means that the debt is growing since the debt service equals principal and interest. At this rate, an unanswered question is how long it will take before the debt service equals the total current real estate tax revenue.

Yup.

When you consider that all of this burden falls on just 2,400 households, you begin to understand that Purcellville is in fact right in line with the Federal model: spend and borrow, spend and borrow.

It’s Time for Change

April 29, 2010 View From the Ridge Comments Off on It’s Time for Change

Submitted By Kelli Grim, Candidate for Town Council

Abraham Lincoln, once said that nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power. Our sixteenth president was an ardent believer in that messy, creaking process we call democracy, both in its capacity to improve the human condition and also to improve the human. Selecting candidates, voting, abiding by the results, are an important part of the process, to be sure. Lincoln thought that the greatest virtue of democracy is that it calls all of us to be better human beings, or, at least, use the process we call democracy to move us farther along on that road. Sometimes, in the rough process of electioneering, amidst all the rhetoric, hoopla, and, yes, the lies and distortions, there is a goal often missed, an arrow that falls far short of its mark. Yet, it is a lofty goal, to both set public policy, even on a stage as small as Purcellville’s, to be a good steward of the people’s money, to set decent, responsible, and compassionate policy, and still to aim for something greater: to become a better human being and to instill in others a respect for the human condition and its vast God-given potential.

So much has passed since the time of Lincoln, some of it good, such as the end of slavery, and some of it bad, two world wars, for example. Someone else said that people get the government they deserve, a proposition I have never agreed with. Why good people do bad things or why good people tolerate people who do bad things is a question I will leave to theologians and residents of Purcellville.

One thing, however, is certain: Lincoln distrusted power, and what it could do to people. And, Lincoln himself had to exercise great power. Leadership is a great part of power, and we touch and influence many lives every single day. Leaders do not have the right to serve only those that agree with them. A good leader is always open to new ideas and never degrades anyone for their own. As a leader, one must respect everyone’s opinions, and embrace, as opposed to belittle, those involved and listening.

The problem in Purcellville is not only that the Town is immersed in debt, but, that its managers are engaged in a shell game with the Town’s finances. Not only are major decisions constantly made behind closed doors, its leaders are impervious to any view but their own, and find it acceptable to ignore citizens requests for explanations. How many lost lawsuits, for example, does it take to drive the point home to the Town’s leaders that you cannot sue your way out of bad decisions. The battle with the County has hurt us all. The battle with the Browns over the Southern Connector Road has diminished all of us as individuals, and as taxpayers. The Town’s childlike attempts to lay at a couple of individuals’ feet the blame for the road delays is erroneous and absurd, with bad consequences for us all.

It is time for a change in the way Purcellville deals with its problems and time for a change in the way Purcellville deals with its citizens, and it is time for a change in the way Purcellville sees itself and in the way it deals with its neighbors. Democracy is a messy, often terrible, often agonizing process, and not immune to outside pressure. That’s why the voting is secret. Because, it is only in a democracy, and in the privacy of the voting booth, where voters do not have to walk the line between pressure and intimidation. There, they can vote their consciences.

The sidewalk to nowhere

October 23, 2009 Columns, View From the Ridge Comments Off on The sidewalk to nowhere

October 23, 2009

One of the observations of American culture in recent decades is that we seem to have thrown common sense out the window.

The problem the Howells have encountered recently is a perfect example of the wrong people being in positions of power, since they seem incapable of understanding how rules and regulations should be set aside when a situation arises where these regulations make no sense.

To make a very long and tedious story short, Warren and Carmen Howell subdivided their property, leaving one-and a half acres with one house on it, and another parcel of seven and a half acres where they want to put in a “green” house: A small energy efficient abode surrounded by the organic blueberries, blackberries and raspberries that Warren has been growing for the past few years, and the sculptures Carmen has created that punctuate the garden. They ordered the modular home, sent in the appropriate applications to the county, and expected a speedy response.

… Continue Reading

Don’t Believe Everything You See

April 10, 2009 Columns, View From the Ridge Comments Off on Don’t Believe Everything You See

By Mark Dewey
April 10, 2009

Ting-Yi Oei, assistant principal at Freedom High School in South Riding, recently endured an ordeal that might serve as a cautionary tale about the ascendancy of image over text in modern culture. Is a picture really worth a thousand words anymore? Or has proliferation made them cheap and tawdry now? Both them and us.

Oei came to our attention on August 21, when sheriff’s deputies arrested him at work. Local papers ran his booking photo next to a headline that would make anyone look sinister: “School Administrator Faces Child Porno Charge.” We gazed at his face, and we imagined. Seeing is believing, after all.

News reports offered little information: deputies had found a photo deemed “inappropriate” on his computer, and he was free on bail awaiting trial. … Continue Reading

Agro-Depot Lends a Hand

March 27, 2009 Business, Columns, View From the Ridge Comments Off on Agro-Depot Lends a Hand

March 27, 2009
By Mark Dewey

This morning’s news left me pondering two different kinds of value, real and false—or maybe it’s two different kinds of people.

I read that Obama decided to give bankers $2 trillion to cover their bad debts—not all bankers, just the ones that tried to make money out of nothing and wound up making this economic disaster instead—and in response investors bought so many stocks that the Dow Jones average rose seven percent in one day. No real value grows that fast.

… Continue Reading

I Want Someone to Like

March 13, 2009 Behind the Scenes, Columns, View From the Ridge Comments Off on I Want Someone to Like

March 13, 2009
By Mark Dewey

During these hard times, when individuals, communities, and entire nations are forced to choose what they will keep and what they must let go, theater seems more generous than ever. For a couple of hours every night, stage actors set themselves aside, allowing characters who wouldn’t otherwise exist to inhabit their bodies and take up their time so people like me can watch, and think, and be consoled. The same words, the same gestures, the same story, night after night. It’s a discipline of self-sacrifice, and I admire people who do it, especially people who do it for joy.

Like the Pieces of Eight Players, for example. Their inaugural production, “Love Letters,” which ran last fall, put two people on stage at separate desks and watched them try to tell each other the truth, a task that took them fifty years. It was the most compelling and consoling piece of theater I’ve seen in Loudoun County, and I took its memory with me to last week’s opening of “Don’t Dress for Dinner.”

Maybe I shouldn’t have done that.

Director Mike Minnicino described “Don’t Dress” as a quintessential 1960s sex farce—a French sex farce—but I’ve never seen one of those, so I researched the play online. It was written during the 1960s by the late French playwright Marc Camoletti and adapted for English production by Robin Hawdon, whose version opened in London in 1991. It ran for seven years without interruption. A lot of Londoners liked it. Chicago’s Royal George Theater has been running a production of the play since last October. A lot of people there like it, too, even with a $60 ticket price.

Google offers nothing but positive reviews. “To say it tickles that much neglected, much-necessary, semimythical, recession-challenged appendage (the funnybone),” writes Chris Jones, theater critic for the Chicago Tribune, “is not to do the show justice.”

Writing on Examiner.com, critic Catey Sullivan begins her review by admitting that she doesn’t like farce. “Farces demand that everyone on stage be an idiot,” Sullivan writes. “Staggering stupidity may be funny in a five-minute sketch, but in a two-hour play it can be as unbearable as nails on a blackboard.”

In the end, however, much to her surprise, she liked the play.

The premise is this: Bernard’s wife, Jacqueline, plans to visit her mother, so Bernard invites his mistress, Suzanne, to the house for the weekend. He also invites his old friend Robert, partially to cover his tracks, partially to show off his mistress. When wife Jacqueline learns that Robert is coming, she cancels her visit with mother because she and Robert are lovers and she wants to have sex with him under her husband’s nose. When Bernard learns that Jacqueline has cancelled her visit, he convinces Robert to pretend that Suzanne is actually his own mistress so Jacqueline won’t suspect Bernard. But Robert confuses Suzette, the cook, with Suzanne, the mistress. Everyone drinks a lot, and lies compound with other lies, until no one seems sure who wants to go to bed with whom.

I agree with Sullivan: most farce strikes me as much ado about nothing, and I attended this production only because it was mounted by Pieces of Eight. In the end, however, I didn’t like the play. And I respect and admire the men and the woman of Pieces of Eight too much not to say so.

I’m able to see that they did some things well. Nancy McCarthy coils the telephone cord around her finger as if it were her lover’s curly hair, and she seems to give herself goose bumps when she scratches the arched back of the sofa. Tim Griffin manages to look more and more confused and as the web of lies proliferates, and the lines he has to deliver get longer and longer. But I find little in the characters to like because they want me to think adultery is funny, and I don’t. Maybe it was funny during the free-love 1960s, but I have a hard time laughing at it now that divorce is becoming the rule for American marriages rather than the exception. Maybe it’s funny in France.

I realize that, as Chris Jones says, the play is meant to satirize “the wimpiness of most adulterers,” but that’s an easy target to hit. Come on, I feel like shouting from the balcony, hard times like these demand the most of us. The time you give up every night is worth more than the wimpiness of most adulterers. Aim for targets farther on, I feel like shouting. I’ll be waiting up here in the balcony, and watching—heckling, maybe—because I know how good you are.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Columns

The Holocene Climate

noerpel_new

(Public Input Loudoun County Board of Supervisors, 7 March, 2017) Figure 1 shows the climate variation over the last million years. The low points on the curve correspond to ice ages when glaciers up to a mile thick covered New …

Choosing To Forgive

moore-sobelnewmug

By Samuel Moore-Sobel “Truly forgiving is the ability to say, ‘Thank you for giving me that experience.’” James Arthur Ray vaulted into fame on the Oprah Winfrey Show back in the mid-2000’s. Stunned hearing these words while watching The Rise and …

Five Key Retirement Questions

Smith0035

Beyond asking yourself where you see yourself and even what your lifelong goal are, effective retirement and longevity planning begs some very big questions. Review the points below and consider how housing, transportation and health considerations all play a role …

Work Woes

drmikenewpic

By Michael Oberschneider, Psy.D. Dr. Mike, I’m a manager at a large tech company and my boss has directed me to fire someone on my team, but as a Christian, I just can’t do it. It’s true that the employee …

Joy or Suffering

Lunde new

By Mary Rose Lunde No one likes to suffer. When given the chance, many people would choose to laugh rather than cry, to sit in silence with their friends rather than talk through their feelings, because not even their friends …

Wage Radio

wage

I will always remember – very fondly – the first time I ever set foot on the property at 711 Wage Drive Southwest in Leesburg, Virginia. It was a warm, sunny July morning in 1997, and I’d driven all the …

Speaking Truth to Power

noerpel_new

“With public sentiment nothing can fail. Without it nothing can succeed.” Abraham Lincoln On Thursday evening, February 23, I requested the Board of Supervisors pass a proclamation resolving to support the March for Science on Earth Day, April 22 [1]. …

Student News

Congratulations, Class of 2016

6 Jul 2016

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Woodgrove High School’s Class Of 2016 Graduation – By Amanda Clark On June 16, Woodgrove’s Class of 2016 was the 5th graduating class to walk the stage and accept their diploma. The ceremony was filled with anticipation as the chorus, …

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Buckland Earns Degree In Medicine

6 Jul 2016

buckland

Molly Buckland, D.O., graduated from the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine with a degree of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine on May 28. While at WVSOM, Dr. Buckland received the Dr. Roland P. Sharp President’s Award and the James R. …

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Adams Promoted To Lieutenant

6 Jul 2016

adamspromoted

Lt. James Adams, from Sterling and a Potomac Falls Halls Graduate, earned the promotion to the rank of Lieutenant. Adams is a Navy Week and Executive Outreach Planner for the Navy Office of Community Outreach in Millington, Tennessee. U.S. Navy …

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Calendar

March 2017
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
February 27, 2017 February 28, 2017 March 1, 2017 March 2, 2017 March 3, 2017

LAST HAM STANDING COMEDY IMPROV

LAST HAM STANDING COMEDY IMPROV
March 4, 2017

Notaviva Vineyards - Bluegrass Jam - FREE event

Notaviva Vineyards - Bluegrass Jam - FREE event
March 5, 2017
March 6, 2017 March 7, 2017 March 8, 2017 March 9, 2017 March 10, 2017 March 11, 2017 March 12, 2017
March 13, 2017 March 14, 2017 March 15, 2017 March 16, 2017 March 17, 2017 March 18, 2017

Wine & Chili Weekend

Wine & Chili Weekend
March 19, 2017

Joshua Carr River Safety Foundation Rummage Sale

Joshua Carr River Safety Foundation Rummage Sale
March 20, 2017 March 21, 2017 March 22, 2017 March 23, 2017 March 24, 2017

March Fourth Friday

March Fourth Friday
March 25, 2017 March 26, 2017

Spring Brunch

Spring Brunch

Spring Brunch

Spring Brunch
March 27, 2017 March 28, 2017 March 29, 2017 March 30, 2017 March 31, 2017 April 1, 2017

”Homage to Mother Earth”

”Homage to Mother Earth”

Nebbiolo Vertical Tasting

Nebbiolo Vertical Tasting

Notaviva Vineyards - Bluegrass Jam - FREE event

Notaviva Vineyards - Bluegrass Jam - FREE event
April 2, 2017

”Homage to Mother Earth”

”Homage to Mother Earth”

GALLERY COFFEEHOUSE: Readers Theater, “One Slight Hitch”

GALLERY COFFEEHOUSE: Readers Theater, “One Slight Hitch”
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Lifestyle

Loudoun Workforce Resource Center Presents STEM Career Fair March 28

16 Mar 2017

Illustration of STEM education word typography design in orange theme with icon ornament elements

Anyone interested in a career in the rapidly growing field of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) is encouraged to attend an upcoming STEM Career Fair in Loudoun. The Loudoun Workforce Resource Center, in partnership with Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC)’s Loudoun campus and NOVA SySTEMic Solutions, is holding a STEM Career Fair Tuesday, March 28, from 1:00 to 4:00 …

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Keep Loudoun Beautiful—Greater Lovettsville Area Volunteers Needed

16 Mar 2017

Lovettsville Boat Launch 7-26-09

The Keep Loudoun Beautiful spring clean-up takes place the entire month of April and greater Lovettsville needs volunteers. Bags, vests, gloves and grabbers are available at the Lovettsville Community Center during normal business hours, Monday-Friday. This is a great group or individual activity that can be scheduled around your availability. E-mail Lovettsville Area Leader, Laura Lieberman, for details and to …

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National Awkward Moments Day

8 Mar 2017

awkward

?Laughing at Yourself Is the Best Medicine No one knows who invented National Awkward Moments Day, Saturday, March 18. That’s no surprise, since it probably came about as the result of one stunningly awkward moment that the owner of that moment was hoping to forget. We surveyed our readers and friends to ask them about their most awkward moments, sharing …

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Editorial

Priscilla Nabs Plum Planning Commission Post

Loudoun County Seal Color

Appointment Shocks Many On January 3 Supervisor Tony R. Buffington Jr. (R-Blue Ridge) nominated Tom Priscilla for the Loudoun County Planning Commission to represent the Blue Ridge District. Priscilla was …

Op-ed

Opinion: Terrorism, Debt, and China: Oh My!

blueridge2.jpg

– By Nick Reid world can be a very dangerous place sometimes, especially for a nation state such as the United States. Although danger is always present, the number and …

Metro Money Mess Pushing West

blueridge2.jpg

– By Delegate Dave LaRock (R-33rd) A local paper recently quoted Loudoun Board Chair Phyllis Randall as saying that in her observation “some of the concerns raised by the people …

Dear Editor

Why Williams Gap Road Should Not Be Paved

blueridge2

Today, most residents of Loudoun County know nothing about Williams Gap, even those living on Williams Gap Road (Route 711). Knowing who “Williams” was, why a gap in the Blue …

Vote No To the Minor Special Exception

catesbyproposal

We are a group of Loudoun County citizens who will be adversely affected if the board grants a special exception for the Catesby Farm property at your upcoming meeting. You …

View From the Ridge

Broken Promises, Hidden by a Six-Foot Berm

blueridge2

By Andrea Gaines On August 9, 1825 at the age of 69, French military officer the Marquis de Lafayette was honored in Leesburg by former President James Monroe. The French-born …

Around Virginia

Protecting Free Speech

Dave_larock

By Dave LaRock (R-33) As elected officials and members of the legislature, our most fundamental responsibility is to protect God-given constitutionally protected rights. The First Amendment of the United States Constitution prohibits the government, including governmental public colleges and universities, from infringing on free speech and the free exercise of …

(3 comments)

Walbridge To Run for State Delegate in the 33rd District

Tia walbridge

Tia Walbridge announces her run for the District 33 seat in the Virginia House of Delegates. Walbridge is a wife and mother of two daughters and an active member of the Round Hill community. “Like many people in our district, my family has found its prosperity in a Virginia-based small …

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Office Building on Capitol Square To Be Named After Civil Rights Pioneer Barbara Johns

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Governor Terry McAuliffe announced that the newly renovated state building located at 202 N. 9th Street on Capitol Square in Richmond (currently known as the 9th Street Office Building) will bear the name of civil rights pioneer Barbara Johns. The building, which reopened last year, houses the Virginia Attorney General’s …

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Sports

Vikings Runner-Up at the State Championship 

8 Mar 2017

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The Loudoun Valley Vikings are the boy’s runner-up at the VHSL 4A State Indoor Track and Field Championships at Roanoke College.  During the 2015-2016 school year, the Loudoun County School Board approved Indoor Track and Field as a Tier 2 (self-funded) sport.  The seven boys competing scored 48 points, second …

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WLVBC U14 Boys Finish 3rd at VA Beach Event

23 Feb 2017

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The Western Loudoun Volleyball Club’s U14 Boys Team garnered 3rd place in their first travel tournament of 2017, the Virginia Beach Invitational. This event was held Feb. 18-19 and featured more than 24 teams from the U14 to U18 age group. The team was second on their net on day …

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